Wheel bolt types...

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bacardincoke
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Wheel bolt types...

Postby bacardincoke » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:59 am

My daughter recently passed her driving test and ended up getting a Skoda Citigo Monte Carlo (what a great wee car!)

Anyhow, it has 4 x alloy wheels as standard but the (full size) spare is a steel item.

There's no second set of bolts for the spare should you fit it, nor any reference to needing them in the owners literature so presumably you use the existing alloy wheel ones?

I was always under the impression alloys and steels had different types of bolts?

Maybe things have moved on and they're now universal in modern cars?
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Megaross
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Re: Wheel bolt types...

Postby Megaross » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:36 am

As far as I'm aware it's a "Don't use wheel nuts made for steels on alloys, but alloy nuts can be used on steels"

There's a different taper on the alloy ones to spread load into a wider surface area because it's a softer metal, on a steel wheel it's fine. I could be wrong though.
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eddypeck
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Re: Wheel bolt types...

Postby eddypeck » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:48 am

Assuming as a Skoda this still has the VAG radius bolts not the taper bolts I'm fairly sure they work for both without issues. If you look at the steel the profile of the wheel bolt hole will be concave to match the radius of bolt and therefore continue to give good surface contact of the bolt area. And because of the radius the weight is distributed in all directions unlike the single angle of pressure on tapered bolts.

Thing to remember, if you have to fit the spare in an emergency at the road side just check the bolts again and ideally torque them appropriately when you get home to some proper tools.

Other option, go to a scrap yard, find a VAG car with steels fitted and get yourself the bolts. If they're different you'll know for sure and keep them in the boot with the tools. If they're no different then you'll know for sure that one kind fits all!
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bacardincoke
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Re: Wheel bolt types...

Postby bacardincoke » Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:57 pm

Cheers people.

I rang the local dealer and while they had to go and check it seems the existing bolts do both alloy wheels and steels (though I'll still be double checking).

I'd a Merc. years ago and it had 4 x alloys with a steel space saver spare.

It came with an additional set of 5 x shorter bolts, and if you wrongly used the longer ones with the narrower space saver they somehow fouled the brakes... I'd image plenty of second and later owners found that out the hard way.
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bacardincoke
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Re: Wheel bolt types...

Postby bacardincoke » Sat Oct 05, 2019 3:04 pm

Looked into this a bit more and there's a lot of conflicting info. out there.

However what seems to be certain is that VAG, (inc. Skoda etc.) wheel bolts are the same for both their factory alloy and steel wheels meaning they're inter-changeable.

Something else (If I've understood correctly!) and that I didn't appreciate is there's basically 3 x types of spare wheel nowadays.

The 'skinny' space saver we all love, a full size but 'temporary' wheel and a 'standard' wheel that's just an extra one of those fitted to the remaining four wheels.

Turns out my daughters is the middle one, a full sized but 'temporary' spare.

It's only to be used to get you home and should be replaced ASAP, plus has the same 50mph/80kph speed restriction as a space saver.

Again if I've understood properly it may be 'illegal' to use different profiles of tyre and wheel spec. on the same axle unless in an emergency such as getting a flat.

Her standard alloy wheels are 5.5 x 15 with 185/55 tyres. The spare steel is 5 x 14 and 165/70. I realise the rolling circumference will be a near match but that's apparently immaterial, it's the effect of the different driving characteristics that are the concern.

It's not that the 'temporay' spare can't handle higher speeds, it's a precaution for when it's used in conjunction with a non-matching wheel/tyre on the other side, hence the limited max. speed.

I've also read in more than one place that space saving or temporary spares should only be fitted to the rear axle (ie. not used to replace the wheels/tyres that steer), meaning with a front puncture there'd be 2 x changes involving rotating one of the inflated rears to the flat front and then putting the spare on the back.

I suppose like a lot of rules and regs. to do with vehicles they only become an issue when something goes wrong and someone starts checking things.
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